How to scare a sleeping person

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"frightened" and when "frightened"

written by: Lena ()

Date: October 13, 2005 9:14 pm


Some verbs have double participle forms. I would like to know when, for example, "frightened" and when "frightened" is used.

"I scared him." Or: "I scared him."
"I was scared." Or: "I was scared."
"I'm scared." Or: "I'm scared."


Other complicated verbs are "turn", "send".

"I've turned the tide."
"I sent the book".

Which of my examples are correct? Thanks in advance.


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Stephan ()

Date: October 13, 2005 9:25 pm


frighten:

strong for yourself, weak for others, so

"I was scared" or "I was scared"

"I scared you" or "I scared you"

for turns also:

"I turned to you" but "I turned the omelette"

at send:

According to taste, many verbs mutate from strong to weak (e.g. bake, who still says "buk" today?), whereby I personally prefer strong with people, weak with things

"he sent the messenger" but "he sent a letter"


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Lena ()

Date: October 14, 2005 1:08 pm


Thanks! So, "You scared me", not "You scared me."


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Charles Trojan ()

Date: November 02, 2005 13:01


... general confusion due to lack of knowledge of grammar, so:
1. ACTION: to frighten someone, frightened, frightened sb
2. RESULT: frightened, frightened, frightened, is frightened

... and who is scared himself? And when he is completely crazy, "he scared himself (!)"

Another tip to understand:
3. the frightened child
4. the frightened child


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Ulrich ()

Date: November 05, 2005 10:25


"... and who is scared himself? And when he's completely turned off," he scared himself (!) "


This is a colloquial form, also in my opinion unfortunate, but permissible:

be scared to be (coll.): to get scared: how scared / scared I was!

best regards

Ulrich


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: MrMagoo ()

Date: November 06, 2005 8:38 pm


> Other complicated verbs are "turn", "send".
>
> "I've turned the tide."
> "I sent the book".



With "send" there is hardly any difference - you just have to note that the form "sent" Not can be used in broadcasting:

"There was a feature film on last night."


In the sense of "sending something (by post)" you can use both forms; "Sent" sounds a bit more formal, possibly even a bit more old-fashioned.



There is still a small nuance in "turning", even if the shapes are often used in a confused manner:

In the sense of "turn to someone, get advice" or "turn your back on someone", the forms "turned / turned" are preferred:

"He turned to his sister. She helped him."
"He turned away and left the house."


In addition, there is "agile" as an adjective participle meaning "agile, clever":

"He plays the piano skillfully."
"She is very skilled in the field of technology".


In the sense of "turn around, take the opposite direction", the forms "turned / turned" are used:

"He turned and drove back."
"The pancakes have to be turned in good time."


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: dr. Maria Malikova ()

Date: November 29, 2017 5:01 pm


About the terms: frighten someone / get frightened

Óh, did I scare you?
Yes you scared me I was scared.

to scare someone = weak verb
scare oneself = strong verb


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Re: frightened / frightened

written by: Milorad Gavrilovic ()

Date: November 29, 2017 7:05 p.m.


frightened / frightened


1. "No, no, let me save it, grandfather," said the terrified child.

2. The frightened child lay weeping on the bed.



Edited 1 time. Last on 11/29/17 8:19 PM.


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Re: frightened or scared?

written by: Camd ()

Date: July 12, 2019 10:58 am


I came across this website by accident because I wanted to know the same thing. Charlstrojan is right, but to clear up the answer:

frighten in active / perfect:
My goodness, did you scare me!

frighten "result" or more precisely (state passive):

The robber was frightened by the owners of the house.

Adjective (Participle II / Past-P)
The frightened robber.

In addition: of course you can be frightened.
That means in English - to startle, to be scared / afraid

Example: The cat was frightened when the dog suddenly barked.


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Gernot Back ()

Date: July 12, 2019 8:06 p.m.


Quote
Camd
The robber was frightened by the owners of the house.


That is not correct German. If you name who caused the fright, the sentence can only be in plotpassive (not in the passive state) and then it says:
The robber is frightened by the owners of the house been.
You wouldn't say:
*I'm 1983 from my mother born (been).!!!



Edited 3 times. Last on 07/12/19 8:10 PM.

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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: newspaper duck ()

Date: August 26, 2019 12:14 am


both are absolutely correct
what changes in both statements (about the robber) is the meaning
in the case of the former, the robber is appalled by the owners
maybe they are wearing torn clothes
the next time the owners scared the robber


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Gernot Back ()

Date: August 26, 2019 8:58 am


newspaper duck wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> both are absolutely correct

What do you mean by "both", what is both right?
Please name or quote the two sentences in full. So much time has to be!


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Isabella Derks ()

Date: August 27, 2019 8:46 am


Incidentally, "agile" is no longer a valid spelling.


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Re: "scared" and when "scared"

written by: Milorad Gavrilovic ()

Date: September 19, 2019 6:26 am


Quote

MrMagoo:

In addition, there is "skillful" as an adjective participle in the meaning "agile, clever ":





Quote

Isabella Derks wrote:

Incidentally, "nimble" is no longer a valid spelling.



Correct.


Quote

DUDEN:

agile
Adjective - earlier spelling for hand

nimble, nimble
Adjective - nimble, agile and skillful, especially in his movements; testifying to agility, dexterity, and skill



agile: adjective (derived from hand) - NEW, only variant after reform
nimble: adjective, NEW, only variant after Reform
agile: adjective, ALT, invalid after reform
agile: adjective, ALT, invalid after reform



Edited 2 times. Last on 19.09.19 06:30.

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Please write German only in the forums!
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